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Butter and cheese saved a little boy


Six-year-old Charlie Smith has struggled with severe epilepsy in Epsom and despite his medication, his condition has not improved. Her parents were completely unemployed, so when a neurologist suggested that they try to change their toddler's routine.

Just three weeks later, and a high fat, but low carbohydrate diet thanks to Charlie, the seizures were completely absent, and even her medication could be omitted. The essence of the ketogenic diet is that the body, instead of converting food-grade carbohydrates into glucose, supplies energy to the body. Instead of glucose, ketones play the role of an "energy carrier" and blood and high levels of ketones in the brain contribute to epileptic seizures Formerly Charlie - who had bipolar disease - has barely eaten due to seizures, he always leaves it empty, and if he can, he eats the butter so much he loves it. In addition to the many cheeses, mayonnaise, mushrooms, eggs in her schedule, her mother, who takes care of her three siblings alongside her brother, checks very carefully how much she gets for her and her vitamin supplements.

Butter and cheese saved a little boy

THE ketogenic diet not all children with epilepsy work, but Dravet's and West's syndromes are very effective. Research has shown that 40 percent of children who do not respond to medication are helped by this diet, but need dietary help.